Dr. Karsten Reichmann

Dr. Karsten Reichmann

is a specialist in sports and joint injuries of any kind, both those requiring an operation, and those which can be treated without surgery. Operations on inpatients are performed in the Waiblinger Zentralklinik. Surgery can also be performed on outpatients and in these cases, the patient arrives at the clinic in the morning and is ready to leave in the afternoon. Generally speaking, the patient should then return to the clinic for a check-up the following day.

Furthermore, Dr. Karsten Reichmann is the medical director and chief surgeon at the Endoprosthesis department in Waiblinger Zentralklinik. There are only a select few centres which are certified as endoprosthesis centres, these having the appropriate volumes of surgery, as well as the appropriate surgical quality, in the endoprosthesis domain (joint replacements for knees and hips).

Bewertung wird geladen...

Member of the following scientific organisations

  • Bund Deutscher Chirurgen (Association of German Surgeons)
  • Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie (The Germany Society for Trauma Surgery)
  • Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin (The Germany Society for Sports Medicine)
  • deutschsprachige Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Arthroskopie (AGA) (The German-language Association for Arthroscopy)

 

Dr. Reichmann is a reference surgeon for computer-navigated cruciate ligament reconstructions and computer-navigated knee replacement surgery.

Curriculum vitae

  • 1986-1991 Studied medicine at the universities of Bochum, Ulm and Tübingen
  • Trained to become a specialist in surgery from 1991-1999 at the Surgical Clinic in the Bad Cannstatt Hospital, Prof. Kieninger, Dr. Stumpf
  • Trained to become a trauma surgeon from 1999-2003Senior physician at the Trauma Surgery department in Erfurt Catholic Hospital from 2001-2002
  • Senior physician at the Clinic for Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena from 2002-2004
  • Resident surgeon/trauma surgeon and inpatient doctor at the Waiblinger Zentralklinik since 01/04/2004
  • Trained in sports medicine from 1992-2001Specialist in orthopaedics and trauma surgery since 16/06/2007
  • Provided care in the domain of sports medicine for:
    VfB Stuttgart football team 1993-1999, 2004-2015
    FC Rot - Weiß Erfurt football team 2000-2004
    SG Sonnenhof Großaspach since 2004,
    EC Stuttgart ice hockey team 1992-1997,
    VfR Aalen football team 2004-2010
    VfL Waiblingen handball team since 2004
    TV Bittenfeld handball team 2005-2009
    RB Leipzig U17- U23 football team since 2015

     

Dr. Reichmann’s specialist areas

Arthroscopic surgery

Most operations in the area of the knee joint are arthroscopic, that is to say, they are performed by making tiny incisions in the skin and inserting a camera. It’s mainly meniscus ruptures and cartilage and ligament injuries that are treated with surgery. One area of focus is the computer-navigated reconstruction of cruciate ligaments, including both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. If the patient has injured their meniscus, there are two possibilities: either parts of the torn meniscus are removed, or the meniscus is stitched up. If they have injured their cartilage, we can clean the bone so new cartilage can be formed, or cartilage bone cylinders can be moved from around non-weight bearing joints to the area where the cartilage is damaged. In certain cases, there’s also the possibility to grow cartilage cells. This involves growing cartilage cells in a dish and then inserting them into the damaged area so new and original joint cartilage can be formed.

Cruciate ligament injuries

 

Cruciate ligament injuries are the most common type of injuries suffered by athletes.
Cruciate ligaments are important ligaments on the inside of the knee joint, limiting the joint’s range of movement and rotation, therefore enabling it to remain stable.

If the knee is twisted or overstretched, or if it receives a blow to the inside or outside of the joint, the cruciate ligaments can tear. Generally speaking, it’s the anterior cruciate ligament that tears the most often.
The anterior cruciate ligament acts like a seat belt for the knee joint. It is extremely important to keep the knee joint stable and prevents the lower leg from sliding forwards. Replacing the anterior cruciate ligament in the event of an injury is the only possibility of making the knee joint stable and enabling the patient to resume their normal sporting activities. It is not possible to stitch a ruptured cruciate ligament together.

Nowadays, the anterior cruciate ligament is normally replaced with tendons from the rear part of the thigh. The semitendinosus tendon is used most frequently and it can range from 28 to 32cm in length. In order to ensure that the cruciate ligament is strong, this tendon is folded four times and then stitched, resulting in a stable cruciate ligament transplant ranging from 7 to 8 cm in length. It is inserted into the knee joint via a duct in the thigh and lower leg that has been created in advance and then fixed in place using small titanium plates and dissolvable screws. It is not necessary to remove the small titanium plates at a later date – they can remain in the body.

After approximately three months, the anterior cruciate ligament transplant should be healed and the knee joint should be stable, but then in most cases it takes several more months before both thigh muscles are equal. For this reason, it is necessary to receive intensive aftercare, followed by an intense training period to build muscle before the patient is able to take part in their sport once again.

Anterior cruciate ligament surgery can also be performed with the aid of computer navigation in order to ensure that the new cruciate ligament is correctly located within the knee joint. However, this is only possible in a few European clinics. This type of surgery involves attaching a transmitter to the thigh and lower leg of the relevant knee joint. Specific points are then captured by an infrared camera and used to create a model of the knee joint on a computer programme. On the basis of this model, the creation of these transplant ducts in the thigh and lower leg is accurate to the nearest 1/10mm.

The patient can gain several advantages from this type of surgery: it is not possible to place the cruciate ligament transplant in the wrong position, movement in the knee joint is restored faster and the risk of the transplant disintegrating and the cruciate ligament rupturing once again is significantly lowered. The “Orthopilot” computer navigation system prolongs the time in surgery from 30 minutes to approx. 40-45 minutes.

Generally speaking, patients must remain in hospital for 3-5 days after having an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, but afterwards they will quickly be able to put their full weight back onto their leg. It is necessary to attend regular check-ups at the clinic so that the doctor can monitor whether the recovery process is going smoothly. The final check-up should take place one year after surgery.

DOWNLOAD MERKBLATT > (Rehabilitation after an ACL reconstruction (semitendinosus)

 

 

Shoulder surgery

Shoulder operations can be arthroscopic, or they can be performed by making a tiny incision in the skin. Generally speaking, torn tendons are reattached to the bone, but if the patient’s shoulder has been dislocated, the edge of the joint is fixed in place with a small brace. If the patient has shoulder impingement syndrome, the subacromial space at the top of the upper arm is widened, meaning the patient can move their shoulder without any pain.

 

Knee cap replacement for knee osteoarthritis

If osteoarthritis occurs on one side of the knee joint, it’s a matter of a knee adjustment operation. This involves correcting the leg axis via an incision in the area of the shinbone, moving the weight-bearing zone of the knee joint to a non-weight bearing section. The bone is then stabilised with a titanium plate. If there is a high amount of wear, a knee cap replacement is performed.

This type of surgery involves removing the worn bone from the knee joint and cementing metal implants to the ends of the femur and tibia. A highly-durable plastic filler with a width of 10-12mm is then inserted in between the bones. This means the patient is then able to painlessly move their knee joint once again and they can also participate in certain types of sport.

Dr. Reichmann performs this surgery using the computer-navigated method, resulting in significantly higher levels of precision. Furthermore, the leg axis can also be corrected, as in many cases this will have been modified by osteoarthritis. In certain instances, this procedure can also be carried out using minimally invasive techniques, in other words, by making an incision 7-10cm in length.

 

Hip joints

If the patient is suffering from osteoarthritis of the hip, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint which can be inserted either with or without ‘cement’. After surgery, the patient is able to put weight on their leg, as well as move it, without any pain. They are also able to participate in certain types of sport requiring hip movements.

 

 

Elbow joints

Torn ligaments can be stitched up in the area of the elbow joint, and any tiny bones which have become free around the joint can be removed in arthroscopic surgery.

 

Ankle joints

Cartilage damage around the ankle joints can be treated in arthroscopic surgery by cleaning the bone, inserting cartilage bone cylinders, growing cartilage cells or performing a transplant. If the patient’s lateral collateral ligament is chronically unstable, it can be reconstructed.

 

Hand and foot surgery

Operations to repair fractured bones in the arms and legs are carried out using state-of-the-art titanium implants. Patients are able to use and put weight on their limbs promptly after surgery.

In terms of hand surgery, both carpal tunnel syndrome and Dupuytren's contracture can be treated by having an operation. Surgery can also be used to remove ganglions.

In terms of foot surgery, Achilles tendon ruptures are treated surgically and ganglions can be removed. Toe deformities (Hallux valgus, hammer toe) can also be treated with surgery using state-of-the-art techniques.

 

 

Sport-related injuries – sports medicine

Dr. Reichmann is a specialist in sports and joint injuries of any kind, both those requiring an operation, and those which can be treated without surgery. Operations on inpatients are performed in the Waiblinger Zentralklinik.
Surgery can also be performed on outpatients and in these cases, the patient arrives at the clinic in the morning and is ready to leave in the afternoon. Generally speaking, the patient should then return to the clinic for a check-up the following day.

Torn ligaments can be stitched up in the area of the elbow joint and any tiny bones which have become free around the joint can be removed in arthroscopic surgery.

Cartilage damage around the ankle joints can be treated in arthroscopic surgery by cleaning the bone, inserting cartilage bone cylinders, growing cartilage cells or performing a transplant. If the patient’s lateral collateral ligament is chronically unstable, it can be reconstructed.

 

Specialist in accident injuries for German employer's liability insurance associations

Dr. Reichmann an authorised medical referee for German employer's liability insurance associations, providing treatment after accidents at work, school or whilst commuting.

 

Get close to the action! - Patient story

Registration

The names have been changed but the stories are real: it was a chance meeting at the reception desk that brought Hans and Peter together. Their own experiences had sharpened their gaze. “Pain?” “Yeah, you too?” “Yeah.”

Between colleagues and fellow sufferers, there wasn’t much more to be said. “Playing sport?” “Yeah, during training, you?” “During a match.” There was just enough time left to share the last important piece of information: “I got injured playing football” – “For me it was playing handball.”

What does an Achilles tendon rupture have to do with a pregnancy in the ninth week? Chantal (our patient’s name for the purposes of this story) knows the answer, because she’s lived through both. And it also explains why surgeon Dr. Karsten Reichmann learned about her pregnancy even before the gynaecologist – and anybody else.